How Research-Driven Organizations Become Thought Leaders

Posts Tagged ‘Impact’

Bring Down Your Paywall

What would change if all research papers were open access?

If we think about this just in terms of access (and not, say, ability to organize and peer-review outside journal structures, which might provide small but non-trivial benefits):

  • People in resource-constrained institutions and situations would now have access to all papers.
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Why You Must Publish for Non-Specialists

Let me be blunt: if you hope to increase the public impact of your expertise, but don’t want to frequently publish content for non-specialists beyond your colleagues, you should abandon that hope immediately.

Publishing frequently for these audiences is the way, the crucible for becoming a much more effective public researcher as quickly as possible.…

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Take This Risk

Experts know.

Authorities know and apply that knowledge credibly, sharing the application habitually and liberally with others it might benefit, building a relationship of trust.

Implicit in that application of knowledge is POV and the risk of focusing your and others’ attention — on the issue, the problem, the solution set.…

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James Clear and the Abrupt POV Shift

Most of us think of points-of-view as things we assume and then invite other people to share.

That’s limiting at best. POVs only have meaning and value as social agreements, as an important defining term in a relationship with someone else.…

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Don’t Play Numbers Games

Among my top-five most-hated science communications tactics: let’s write a letter to X journal and get Y number of people to sign it. That’ll get their attention and change things!

Sadly: while Y might get their attention (briefly), it’s never nearly enough to change things.…

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Accuracy Isn’t Everything

There’s no “right” way to communicate research (although there are plenty of ineffective ways). There are only tradeoffs between accuracy on the one hand and precision, relevance and impact on the other.

Pretending those tradeoffs don’t exist — or not being crystal clear about which is more important for the goals you want to achieve — is an excellent way to make your expertise invisible, or visible for the wrong reasons.…

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