SCIENCE+STORY:

the podcast

The ways we talk to the world about science & expertise aren’t working.

Let’s fix that.

NOW LIVE

The conversation

Why doesn’t the world listen more to science and research?

And what can be done to change that?

Leading scientists, researchers, communicators and others talk with host Bob Lalasz about the challenges and opportunities for making research-based expertise heard.

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LATEST EPISODES

Check in every other Monday for new thoughts from Bob and his guests.

The chief analytics officer of the digital & data strategy firm ParsonsTKO talks about the content metrics he watches, why research orgs need to promote their individual experts more, & why a new project at ParsonsTKO aims to bring data innovation to the research world at large.
The senior lecturer in higher education at Lancaster University talks with Bob about what research grimpact is, when and why it occurs, why it’s so difficult for researchers to imagine, and why the drive for impact in research actually fuels grimpact.
Faith talks with Bob about the limitations of performative science communication, the hidden risks science communicators face and her new Island Press Book, “Getting to the Heart of Science Communications.”
Why is social psychologist Daniël Lakens subjecting research to software’s “red team” approach, in which developers pay independent teams to find bugs in their code? And could red teaming help in communicating that research?
Lion conservation scientist Amy Dickman on the myth of self-sustaining conservation in Africa, getting death threats from trophy hunting opponents and the false choice between evidence & emotion in science communication.
The chief scientist of Australia’s Queensland state (and former chief scientist of The Nature Conservancy) talks about culling koalas, dreary conservationists & his biggest science communications failures.

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Learn when new episodes of Science+Story drop and get Bob Lalasz’s weekly essays on how research communications can join the 21st century.